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Once Upon A Bookshelf

Where Fiction and Reality Meet

Listed: Napoleonic Wars

I started enjoying literature taking place during the Napoleonic Wars thanks to the wonderful Horatio Hornblower books by C.S. Forester. Since then I’ve had my eyes open for other books in that time period – unfortunately, though I’ve had my eyes open for them, it doesn’t necessarily mean that I’ve yet read them, as Rachel would most likely point out (especially in relation to Patrick O’Brian’s books).

Anyway! Ten books that take place during the Napoleonic Wars, for your perusal:

  1. Horatio Hornblower series by C.S. Forester. First book in the series, The Happy Return, published 1937. LT.
  2. Aubrey–Maturin series by Patrick O’Brian. First book in the series, Master and Commander, published 1969. LT.
  3. Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willig. First book in the series, The Secret History of the Pink Carnation, published 2005. LT.
  4. Richard Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell. First book in the series, Sharpe’s Eagle, published 1981. LT.
  5. Set the Seas on Fire by Chris Roberson. Originally Published 2001. LT.
  6. Persuasion by Jane Austen. Originally Published 1818. LT.
  7. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. Originally Published 2004. LT.
  8. An Infamous Army by Georgette Heyer. Originally Published 1937. LT.
  9. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. Originally Published 1847-1848. LT.
  10. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. Originally Published 1869. LT.

Have I missed one that you think should be on this list? Let me know!

Do you like this feature? You should also check out Librarian’s Book Reviews’ Listless Monday and A Bookshelf Monstrosity’s Books By A Theme.

Posted by Courtney Wilson @ 7:26 am April 19, 2010.
Category: Listed

  • http://www.strangely-normal.com Shannon

    Once upon a time there was this book I read, and I really liked it, but I was in high school at the time, so I don’t know if it’s actually any good or not. I gave it to a friend who also liked it, so hopefully we weren’t both teens who liked terrible books.

    The book had Napoleon as a character, and there were two story lines, one during revolutionary France, and one in 1970s New York. The book revolved around an ancient chess set with supposed mythical properties. And there was sailboat sex. I don’t know why I remember that part in particular but I do. Don’t judge.

    Anyways, after much Googling, I discover that this book is called The Eight, and it’s by a lady named Katherine Neville. It has a Wikipedia article. This is its URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eight_(novel)

  • Lisa

    Temeraire series by Naomi Novik

  • http://bookshelfmonstrosity.blogspot.com A Bookshelf Monstrosity

    You always have the coolest list themes! Keep em coming.

  • http://heidenkind.blogspot.com/ heidenkind

    Where’s the Scarlet Pimpernell?

  • http://minniebeaniste.wordpress.com Minnie

    Oh, what a great question! Bit late to the party, but second the Scarlet Pimpernell(with reservations; bet it now seems dated). Then there are quite a few of Georgette Heyer’s regency romances (amazingly detailed; mad plots; interesting characters – light, fun reads); but one – ‘The Spanish Bride’ – is set during the Peninsular Campaign and based on real characters. Then your compatriot, Rose Melikan, whose take on the period is compelling with an intriguing, espionage hook. To backtrack slightly, giving you the background historical events that allowed the rise of Napoleon, there’s Hilary Mantel’s ‘A Place of Greater Safety’ (the French Revolution, focusing on the major players). If you want adventure, then there’s the Hawkwood series by James McGee. Finally, Jane Austen, Jane Austen, Jane Austen: the best – head and shoulders above the rest. Happy reading!

  • http://minniebeaniste.wordpress.com Minnie

    Whoops, sorry – in a rush to post (tut!), forgot you’d mentioned Heyer.